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In this May 23, 2018 photo, teacher Gianna Gurga, left, speaks to students Faith Broadway, center, and Maisha Chowdhury Jabia, right, as she leads a class on financial literacy at Dag Hammarskjold Middle School in Wallingford, Conn. To guide student lessons and behavior Gurga uses the Classcraft, one of many programs that borrow elements from video games to engage students. Games have been a part of education for generations, but not new technology is powering programs that borrow elements from video games to engage students, customize learning and modify behaviors. (AP Photo/Michael Melia)

In this May 23, 2018 photo, teacher Gianna Gurga, left, speaks to students Faith Broadway, center, and Maisha Chowdhury Jabia, right, as she leads a class on financial literacy at Dag Hammarskjold Middle School in Wallingford, Conn. To guide student lessons and behavior Gurga uses the Classcraft, one of many programs that borrow elements from video games to engage students. Games have been a part of education for generations, but not new technology is powering programs that borrow elements from video games to engage students, customize learning and modify behaviors. (AP Photo/Michael Melia)