OCTOBER 14

Oct. 14, 1792: James Ireland Tipton was born in Elizabethton. His parents were Samuel and Susannah Reneau Tipton. Tipton farmed and operated a rolling mill, at which place he manufactured nails and other iron pieces, such as fire sets. Tipton organized the Buffalo Creek Church. Following the death of his first wife, Mr. Tipton married Joanna Gourley on his birthday, Oct. 14, 1824. Tipton is buried at Green Hill Cemetery near the former rayon plants in Elizabethton. Johnson City’s first historian, Mary Hardin McCown, was Tipton’s great-granddaughter.

Oct. 14, 1892: The Comet, reminded readers “All Knights belonging to Lodge No. 3059, and all other Knights residing in the city, are hereby called to meet in Lodge Hall Friday night, October 14, at 6:45.” The article continued to say, “Five more initiations and other important business awaiting the lodge.” It was signed by J.W. Slater, who was the lodge reporter.

Oct. 14, 1903: Dr. Kenneth Carl Spaulding was born Oct. 14, 1903. Spaulding and his wife moved to Johnson City in 1955, so he could become head of the Economics Department at what was then East Tennessee State College. Spaulding served in that position until his death in 1971.

Oct. 14, 1905: The Knoxville Sentinel, with a dateline from Johnson City, reported, “Progress is being made on the many business blocks which are being erected in this city. The following are under construction: Weiler & Masengill’s, Armbrust & Smith’s, Cargill’s, H.C. Miller’s, Johnson City bank, Robert Burrows’ and Adams’ blocks. All will be finished by January 1.”

Oct. 14, 1915: The Comet reported, “The city council has decided to accept the magnificent free site which has been tendered by Mr. George L. Carter to the city for the court house which is to cost $37,500. The lot, on which the new temple of justice is to be erected, is one of the best as well as one of the most ideal in the city. It has three street fronts, is on a principal street and the car line. Quite a little opposition was manifested at first against the Carter site, and it was thought the question might have to be settled by a vote of the people.” Accounting for inflation, $37,500 in 1915 is worth about $965,000 in today’s dollars.

Oct. 14, 1930: The Nashville Banner, with a dateline of Johnson City, reported, “Roy Turner, 30, was killed when his own truck ran across his body at his home near here (meaning Johnson City) Monday night.” The article continued, “While Turner was cranking the truck it was stuck by an automobile driven by Leon Hendrix, a neighbor.” Additional details include that “Hendrix said rain and the lights of the approaching car prevented his seeing the truck, which had no lights. A coroner’s jury returned a verdict of accidental death.”

Oct. 14, 1952: The new sanctuary at First Christian Church was dedicated. William Eliza Sweeney was the speaker for the dedication ceremony. The physical building is now known as Downtown Christian Church.

Oct. 14, 1969: The Johnson City Press-Chronicle told readers, “John A. Smith, 48, Carter Ave., was admitted to Memorial Hospital yesterday morning and is being treated for amputation of the middle finger of his right hand. The accident occurred at Tennessee Tank Co. where he is employed. He is listed in satisfactory condition today.”

Oct. 14, 1971: The Elizabethton Kiwanis Club had “recently passed a resolution supporting the move to establish a medical school in connection with East Tennessee State University.

Oct. 14, 1981: In his column in the Johnson City Press-Chronicle Tom Hodge reminded readers that it was time to begin looking for woolly worms as an old-fashioned and fun way to predict the upcoming winter weather. The more black segments the wooly worms have, the harder the winter is to be. If the first segment of the woolly worm is black, winter will begin as very cold. If the first segment is brown, the beginning of winter will be milder.

Oct. 14, 1990: The Johnson City Press reported on that curbside recycling would begin in Johnson City on Monday, Nov. 12.

Rebecca Henderson is a contributing columnist for Johnson City Press.

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