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Letters: Yay, dads!

Johnson City Press • Jun 23, 2019 at 6:00 AM

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Yay, dads!

I would like to take this opportunity to applaud the fathers of my son’s generation. These are the hands-on dads of today.

While their work and careers are of prime importance, they still manage to take more than an observational interest in their children. It is heartwarming to see them attending school functions, shopping and at play with their children.

The number of young men who are really involved as dads is increasing, and all to the benefit of the children. Recent statistics have shown that children with active fathers are faring better academically and socially.

Overall, today’s fathers are more skilled at parenting and communication. This has been due, in part, to education and a major expansion of their role. And it is to be acknowledged that employers have kept pace and have a keener appreciation of the importance of the family unit.

From our observation, the dads are loving it. They truly advocate for and enjoy involvement with their children. This is becoming increasingly important with the rising numbers of single-parent families.

Almost anyone can become a parent, but it takes someone special to be a real mom or dad.

Think your child doesn’t need you? Just envision the kind of adult you will want your child to become.

If we all don’t advocate for all of our children, who will? Happy Fathers Day.

PATRICIA A. MILLER
Johnson City

Brush Creek is dangerous

In an effort to solve flooding in downtown Johnson City, Founders Park was developed.

The city did extensive masonry work in Brush Creek, which winds through the park, to channel the flow of water.

After heavy rain, Brush Creek turns into a raging river that exits the park by going underground.

I recently met with several members of city management and expressed my concerns about a child or adult falling into the creek after a heavy rain and being swept underground and drowning.

If the city doesn’t provide a safety fence along the creek, a death will eventually result.

I was informed by city management that Founders Park wasn’t really a “park” it was a flood control area that the city developed.

The city has had numerous festivals in the flood control area that they named Founders Park and even built steps that allow children to easily get into the creek.

I hope the city is monitoring and testing the water quality of Brush Creek which runs through Founders Park!

PETE PADUCH
Johnson City

Tailgaters are chasing disaster

I recently moved back to Johnson City after a brief stay in Florida. Two years to be exact.

I thought it would be a welcomed return to driving on safe highways. Wrong!

I have lived in Johnson City most of my adult life, so I’m well aware of what Interstate 26 used to be like. Now, living in Florida, experiencing rush-hour traffic on Interstate 275 through St. Petersburg, four and five lanes bumper-to-bumper for miles, that’s not uncommon. I mean four and five lanes of traffic and everybody in a hurry, yeah, there’s going to be an accident. Here we have two lanes and it seems like an accident every other day!

So what is the problem? I will spare you all of the possibilities and just get straight to what I think it is. Cars are simply allowed to drive too close to one another.

Apparently nobody paid attention in the driving books as to what a proper following distance is. Every morning trains of cars go past me at 80 mph with no more than one car length in between them, most times eight, nine and10 cars long.

This is just a disaster waiting to happen. And what is being done about it? Nothing.

I see police monitoring things from the side of the road, ticketing very few motorists, mostly for speeding I’m sure.

I wonder how easy it would be to ticket someone for following at an unsafe distance? Not too difficult I imagine?

It is just really super frustrating to see it every day and wonder when or if anything will change. I guess people have to just learn the hard way, unfortunately.

As for me, I’ll be in the slow lane, driving at a safe following distance, shaking my head as I creep by another accident scene.

JOSEPH EDWARDS
Johnson City

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