logo


no avatar

Today in Johnson City History: May 11

Rebecca Henderson and Johnson City Press • May 11, 2020 at 11:30 AM

May 11, 1870: The Daily Press and Herald, a newspaper in Knoxville, reported that “Quite a serious affray took place at Johnson City … in which a saloon keeper, named Matt Taylor, broke a candy jar over the head of a man by the name of Ford, cutting his face and head severely. This he followed up by breaking a heavy walking stock over his victim. The Mayor of the city interfered and commanded the peace, and would have arrested the offenders, but for the want of a calaboose, in which to lock them up.”

May 11, 1886: The Chattanooga Commercial reported, “A new bank has been started at Johnson City. This is a great convenience to this section.”

May 11, 1905: First Christian Church conveyed its former lot and site of the church at 124 E. Main St. to the City National Bank for a price of $5,750.

May 11, 1912: The Johnson City Staff opined, “Bob Taylor was born to the lecture field, to make people laugh and cry and arouse their better feelings.”

May 11, 1928: The Johnson City Chronicle reported, “Mr. and Mrs. Marion Harmon have moved from the Unaka apartments into their new home on Boone Street.”

May 11, 1944: The Johnson City Press-Chronicle reported that “Miss Helen Hunter has returned from Memphis, where she visited friends last weekend.”

May 11, 1959: Griffith Motors, 84-86 Wilson Ave., advertised the “clean winged beauty” of the 1959 Buick.

May 11, 1962: The Johnson City Press-Chronicle published an image Police Chief C.E. Mullenix examining the weapon used to killed car dealer Roy E. Faircloth the previous night. Faircloth was shot to death during a party at the dealership by fellow local businessman Hack Smithdeal. Although he never denied shooting Faircloth, a jury acquitted Smithdeal of first-degree murder after determining he shot his former friend in self-defense.

May 11, 1965: Dr. Eugene S. Kilgore, a local dentist, advertised his candidacy for the Johnson City Board of Education. Dr. Kilgore was a pioneering civil rights advocate in Johnson City. This was the same year the city’s schools were fully integrated.

Johnson City Press Videos