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New TCAT Elizabethton instructor will kick off advanced manufacturing class

John Thompson • Dec 31, 2019 at 10:11 PM

ELIZABETHTON — When Gov. Bill Lee visits the Tennessee College of Applied Technology campus in Elizabethton on Friday afternoon to see the impact of the $1 million grant from his Governor’s Investment in Vocational Education, one of the people he will meet is new teacher Charles Phillips.

He has just joined the TCAT Elizabethton and began teaching advanced manufacturing, a new training program that starts this month.

College President Dean Blevins said Phillips has extensive experience in various facets of advanced manufacturing technology. The program offers three career paths: (1) robotics automation, (2) programmable logic controls automation, and (3) plastics injection molding.

“Training in these areas are related to the high-tech manufacturing industry of today’s economy. Completion of the program yields an engineering technician diploma,” Blevins said.

Phillips brings more than 21 years experience to the position. He graduated from TCAT Elizabethton in 1991 with a major in electricity and electronics. He also holds an associate of applied science degree in electrical technology and electronic engineering from Northeast State and a bachelor of science degree in computer information systems from Milligan College.

Certificates will be awarded as a protective maintenance certificate after one trimester, as a mechanical maintenance assistant after two trimesters; a diploma will be awarded as a process technician after three trimesters; a diploma as a manufacturing technician after four trimesters; and a robotics automation technician diploma will be awarded after 20 months of training.

Classes meet from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday at the main campus, 426 Hwy. 91 North, across from the Elizabethton Municipal Airport in the Watauga Industrial Park.

To be admitted to TCAT Elizabethton, students must apply online at www.tcatelizabethton.edu. Select a program and follow instructions.

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