Johnson City Press Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Education

Collector's dream? ETSU unveils centennial postal cancellation, stamps

August 10th, 2011 2:37 pm by Rex Barber

For collectors of unique or rare items, there are now several more to commemorate the 100th anniversary of East Tennessee State University –– a commemorative pictorial postmark and three stamps.
The school, which will celebrate its centennial Oct. 2, unveiled the pictorial postmark Wednesday morning in the lobby of the administration building. The public was invited to get an envelope with one of the three stamps affixed to it and the postmark applied by Harvey Byerley, manager of ETSU’s mail services.
“Today is a special service,” Byerley said after stamping dozens of envelopes. “It’s commemorating the 100th anniversary of the university. There’s been a series of (anniversary) events that’s been taking place ever since last October with the convocation. Today it’s focusing on memorabilia for stamp collectors. It’s based on cancellations, which are collectors items. They tend to be valuable over a period of time.”
The postmark was designed by Jeanette Henry of ETSU printing and publications. It features the centennial logo, along with the words describing ETSU’s mission: teaching, research and public service.
The postmark cancellation will be in use at the ETSU mail services office for 65 days, according to the school. The special postage stamps, which feature images of the school’s amphitheater, carillon and Sherrod Library, should be available soon for purchase.
For more information, contact ETSU mail services at (423) 439-6894.
Daryl Carter, ETSU assistant professor of history and also a member of the university’s Centennial Steering Committee, was in line Wednesday to get the cancellations for himself and his wife, who also works at ETSU.
“And we just love this place,” Carter said. “It’s very important to us that we’re a part of the centennial event.”
Carter said having a memento of ETSU’s 100-year milestone was important. He planned to frame the envelopes he got.
“The importance of these types of events and these types of things just can not be underrated in that it’ll never happen again,” Carter said. “It’ll never be around again, and for people in the future, it’ll be nice for them who weren’t a part of this to come back and be able to see artifacts, evidence of these types of events and the 100th anniversary of the university.”


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